Sunday, August 28, 2011

Thought for the Day

 
Thought for the Day
Now to him who is able to do immeasurably more than all we ask or imagine, according to his power that is at work within us, to him be glory in the church and in Christ Jesus throughout all generations, for ever and ever! Amen.
Ephesians 3:20-21
 
J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914
 

Fw: Fwd: American Sheep Industry Weekly August 26, 2011

 
J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914
 

----- Forwarded Message -----
From: "Suen65@aol.com" <Suen65@aol.com>
To: wjbrown@wildblue.net; brownjpaul@yahoo.com; meanmomma2@gmail.com; ned_barb@frontier.net; hbaxstrom@gmail.com; waynebuck@wildblue.net; ranchluv@yahoo.com; debbiebrown_6@yahoo.com; jeffbarnes@wildblue.net; k.briar@hotmail.com; dlbriar@hotmail.com; lasaterlamb@gmail.com; rjnaegle@frontier.net
Sent: Saturday, August 27, 2011 3:56 PM
Subject: Fwd: American Sheep Industry Weekly August 26, 2011
In a message dated 8/26/2011 1:37:10 P.M. Mountain Daylight Time, mary@sheepusa.org writes:
HSUS: Dreadful Charity Practices

Three times a year, the venerable American Institute of Philanthropy (AIP) analyzes publicly reported information from charities and issues a report card grading how well these organizations spend their money. Unlike other charity analysts, AIP digs past the face-value data to get a more accurate measure of how effective a charity is.

In its latest report, AIP gives the deceptively named Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) a "D" grade, yet again. Last year, AIP gave HSUS a "D" grade, twice, due to the animal rights group's lackluster performance in using donors' contributions. Even the organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has a "C-plus" grade.

AIP finds that HSUS spends up to 49 cents to raise every dollar and spends as little as 49 percent of its budget on programs.

This is similar to the findings of Animal People News' Watchdog Report, which analyzed HSUS' 2008 tax return and found that up to half of HSUS' budget is spent on overhead costs.

It's worse when you consider that HSUS' grossly inefficient spending is likely done with a lot of money that donors intended to go to real humane societies, such as their local pet shelter, and not an animal rights group.

According to national polling, 71 percent of Americans mistake HSUS for a pet-shelter umbrella group, and 63 percent wrongly believe that HSUS is affiliated with their local humane society or pet shelter. In reality, HSUS shockingly shares less than one percent of its budget with these needy local shelters.

Reprinted in part from humanewatch.org


 
August 26, 2011
ASI WEEKLY
NEWS FOR SHEEP INDUSTRY LEADERS
American Sheep Industry Association; 9785 Maroon Circle, Suite 360; Englewood, CO 80112-2692 Phone: (303) 771-3500 Fax: (303) 771-8200 Writer/Editor: Judy Malone E-mail: judym@sheepusa.org Web sites: http://www.sheepusa.org and http://www.sheepindustrynews.org

ASI Recommends Changes to FSIS Lamb Nutrition Facts

In July 2011, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Food Safety Inspection Service (FSIS) published a nutritional fact sheet for lamb and other meats. The American Sheep Industry Association (ASI) and the American Lamb Board reviewed the lamb fact sheet and, in a letter to FSIS this week, recommended several corrections.

These recommendations included the misidentification of a cut and modifications to cut trimming standards, specific calorie and protein content and specific cooking methods.


Motion to Bar Wolf Hunts Denied

A federal appeals court on Thursday denied a request by animal activist groups to halt wolf hunts that are scheduled to begin next week in Idaho and Montana.

The Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals denied the request by the groups that were seeking to cancel the hunts while the court considers a challenge to congressional action in April that removed wolves from federal protection in Montana and Idaho and in parts of Washington, Oregon and Utah.

Wolf hunts are scheduled to begin Aug. 30 in Idaho and Sept. 3 in Montana.

Reprinted in part from GreatFallsTribune.com


Eastern Wolf's Territory Labeled as Gray Wolf's

The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service reopened the public comment period on its May 5 proposal to remove the gray wolf population in the Western Great Lakes from the Federal List of Endangered and Threatened Wildlife because the wolf there actually is a different species. Removing all or parts of 29 eastern states from the gray wolf's designation of critical habitat also is being addressed.

The original public comment period closed on July 5, and the agency says it received more than 800 comments on the proposal.

The controversy regarding the gray wolf revolves around the reclassification of what the agency now believes are two distinct species of wolf, the gray wolf (Canis lupus) and the eastern wolf (Canis lycaon). The eastern wolf has historically been classified as a subspecies of gray wolf.

Species are listed under the Endangered Species Act at the species level, so once the agency had determined that the eastern wolf was in fact its own species, a reevaluation of protections afforded the gray wolf was instigated by several state fish and game departments and conservation groups.

Currently, the gray wolf is listed as endangered throughout the eastern United States, even though that area is the historical range of the newly recognized species the eastern wolf.

Thus, the agency proposed to delist the gray wolf in areas now believed to be the range of the eastern wolf and to initiate a status review of the eastern wolf throughout its range.

The extended comment period will close Sept. 26. To review the Federal Register posting, go to www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2011-08-26/html/2011-21839.htm.


Forum to Focus on Antibiotic Use in Food Animal Production

The use of antibiotics in the production of food animals elicits polarizing opinions across the media today as consumers become more aware and interested in the way their food is produced. While livestock producers have realized that significant animal illness can be avoided by the use of antibiotics, consumers are being told that any use of antibiotics leads to a lower effectiveness of antibiotics in humans.

Although there have been several debates and discussions on this issue, the National Institute for Animal Agriculture (NIAA) is planning a national forum in which experts in animal agriculture, researchers in the area of livestock health and experts in human health will come together to have a dialogue about the use of antibiotics in the sustainable production of food.

Participants in the forum will have the opportunity to hear from the research leaders and experts and join in the dialogue.

The forum, entitled "Antibiotic Use in Food Animals: A Dialogue for a Common Purpose," is scheduled to be held at the Hotel InterContinental O'Hare in Chicago, Ill., on Oct. 26-27. Registration is open to anyone interested in this issue. The registration fee is $295 with discounts for early registration and for NIAA members.

For more information, go to www.animalagriculture.org.


Quiet Start to First Internet Wool Auction

One of Australia's oldest industries has finally embraced the internet age with the first-ever online wool auction. Wool has been sold over the internet in the past via an electronic offer board, but the new system launched by the company, Auctions Plus, allows buyers to bid for bales in real time.

Landmark wool manager, Dave Hart, says it will take some time for interest in the new system to build amongst both buyers and sellers.

"It was a very interesting exercise, met with probably limited success in terms of how many bales were sold. Out of 1,100 bales offered, only 243 bales were sold," Hart said. "The online auction is planned to be a weekly event but will be conducted in a cooperative manner with the rest of the wool trade. It's a marketing option to complement what we already have, the proponents are saying."

The online auction was conducted last week by Wool Trade Plus, an arm of Auctions Plus, which has run livestock auctions online for many years. Auctions Plus is jointly owned by Landmark, Elders, and Rural Co. (also known as Roberts Ltd).

Reprinted in part from ABC Rural, Australia


Pennsylvania School District Using Sheep to Cut Costs

A small school district in Carlisle, Penn., is losing $2 million in state support this year after the state legislature made some of the largest education cuts in decades. But one school has come up with a creative way to take a small bite out of that deficit.

Tucked into a very informative article at Stateline about education cuts around the country is the delightful fact that Carlisle's Wilson Middle School assistant principal has donated the use of seven of his sheep to cut the school's grass. The sheep are expected to save the district an estimated $15,000 on yearly mowing costs.

"There were some people who called the principals," the district's superintendent, John Friend, told Stateline. "They thought that someone was playing a prank."

The district also installed solar panels last year on the six-acre plot where the sheep graze. Friend hopes the panels will further reduce costs.

Reprinted in part from news.yahoo.com


USDA Asks for Input to Improve Processes

The U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) is soliciting ideas about how to improve processes by consolidating information collected through the Farm Service Agency, Risk Management Agency and other USDA agencies.

The department has asked for ideas about how to simplify and standardize acreage reporting processes, program dates and data definitions, as well as how to allow farmers to use their farm-management and precision-agriculture systems for reporting production, planted and harvested acreage and other information needed to participate.

Comments are due by Sept. 19. More information is available at www.usda.gov/open.


Dairy Video Goes Viral

When Derik Milanesio decided to create a music video on his dairy farm in Strathmore, Calif., last month, he had no idea the attention it would receive. The music video, "Where them cows at," has gone viral. As of Monday, the video has had more than 8,200 views and the number keeps climbing. The video is available at http://vimeo.com/25964011.

Milanesio, herd manager for Frank Pinheiro Dairy, says he got the idea for the video after watching a friend's video on YouTube. His friend is a chicken farmer in Arkansas who made a video (youtube.com/watch?v=MFjE0qeUOq4) about the "chicks" on his farm.

"I said I can do better than that," says Milanesio.

Milanesio says he is surprised at how quickly the video took off. "We weren't originally planning to share it, but before we knew, it had already gone viral," he says.

The other surprising thing, he says, is that the video was spread by the agriculture industry - "It is amazing to see how the agriculture industry is connected."

Reprinted in part from Dairyherd.com


Uruguay Expects Smallest Wool Clip in Over 100 Years

Uruguay is facing its smallest clip in over 100 years. The 2011-2012 season's wool production is estimated to be limited to 32 million kilograms, according to Joaquin Martinicorena, president of Uruguay's Wool Secretariat (SUL).

The disclosure was done during the official opening of the Uruguay 2011-2012 shearing season.

Minister of Agriculture and Livestock, Tabare Aguerre, said the clip this year will include the shearing of 7.5 million sheep and close to 2 million lambs, totaling an estimated 32 million kilograms of wool. A couple of decades ago, Uruguay's flock was more than 25 million.

However, the 2011-2012 season will be "the inflection point for Uruguay's falling sheep stock because of the excellent prices for wool and lamb", added SUL president.

Minister Aguerre said he was optimistic about the future of the sheep industry, emphasizing that sheep play an important role in rural development and social inclusion, and the purpose of the National Strategic Plan for the sector is basically to expand the production of lambs.

Reprinted in part from mercopress.com


Financing to Enable Largest Slaughter Facility in Norway

The Nordic Investment Bank announced it signed a loan with Norwegian meat and egg supplier, Nortura SA, for NOK 315 million (US$58 million) to finance construction of what will become Norway's largest slaughterhouse.

The facility, to be constructed in central Norway, will slaughter cattle and sheep.

The new slaughterhouse will replace four of Nortura's old slaughterhouses, as well as a meat processing plant. In addition, three slaughterhouses owned by the meat company Spis Grilstad will be replaced due to a cooperation agreement between Nortura and Spis Grilstad.

Nortura expects to more than cut in half energy consumption by replacing the older slaughterhouses with a new modern facility. The new slaughterhouse, which was finalized in August 2010, will also significantly reduce water usage.

Nortura SA is organized as a cooperative owned by approximately 17,800 farmers and has industrial operations in 34 municipalities, with approximately 5,800 employees.

Reprinted in part from meatingplace.org


HSUS: Dreadful Charity Practices

Three times a year, the venerable American Institute of Philanthropy (AIP) analyzes publicly reported information from charities and issues a report card grading how well these organizations spend their money. Unlike other charity analysts, AIP digs past the face-value data to get a more accurate measure of how effective a charity is.

In its latest report, AIP gives the deceptively named Humane Society of the United States (HSUS) a "D" grade, yet again. Last year, AIP gave HSUS a "D" grade, twice, due to the animal rights group's lackluster performance in using donors' contributions. Even the organization People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has a "C-plus" grade.

AIP finds that HSUS spends up to 49 cents to raise every dollar and spends as little as 49 percent of its budget on programs.

This is similar to the findings of Animal People News' Watchdog Report, which analyzed HSUS' 2008 tax return and found that up to half of HSUS' budget is spent on overhead costs.

It's worse when you consider that HSUS' grossly inefficient spending is likely done with a lot of money that donors intended to go to real humane societies, such as their local pet shelter, and not an animal rights group.

According to national polling, 71 percent of Americans mistake HSUS for a pet-shelter umbrella group, and 63 percent wrongly believe that HSUS is affiliated with their local humane society or pet shelter. In reality, HSUS shockingly shares less than one percent of its budget with these needy local shelters.

Reprinted in part from humanewatch.org


MARKET NEWS

Weekly National Market Prices for Wool

The U.S. Department of Agriculture's prices for wool can be accessed at www.fsa.usda.gov/FSA/webapp?area=home&subject=prsu&topic=col-nl-wm.
< 18.6 Micron 3.88 6.89 Not Available 18.6-19.5 3.38 6.03 Not Available 19.6-20.5 2.94 5.27 Not Available 20.6-22.0 2.72 5.00 Not Available 22.1-23.5 2.56 4.49 Not Available 23.6-25.9 2.33 3.54 Not Available 26.0-28.9 1.78 2.32 Not Available > 29 Micron 1.38 1.95 Not Available
GREASE PRICES in $ per pound
Ungraded Wool 66 cents 40 cents 00 cents Unshorn Pelt
6.865 lbs xUngraded Wool LDP
$1.99 / head Wool LDPs are not available when the weekly repayment rate is above loan rate.


Market Summary, Week ending August 19, 2011
The updated Market Summary can be accessed each Monday at www.sheepusa.org/Weekly_Market_Summary or by calling 303-771-3500, ext. 37.
Feeder Prices, San Angelo, 40-105 lbs. for 220-242 $/cwt.
Slaughter Prices - Negotiated, Live, wooled and shorn 115-185 lbs. for 170-206 $/cwt. (wtd. ave. 184.15); dressed, no sales reported.
Slaughter Prices - Formula, 2,988 head1 at 343-404.82 $/cwt. for 70.2 ave. lbs.; 2,672 head at 364-390 $/cwt. for 91.9 ave. lbs.
Equity Electronic Auction, shorn 145 lbs. for $183.75/cwt.
Cutout value/Net carcass value2 $380.42/cwt.
Carcass Price, Choice and Prime, YG 1-4, weighted averages, 1,541 head at 55-65 lbs. for $378.59/cwt., 1,971 head at 65-75 lbs. for $366.06/cwt., 1,646 head at 75-85 lbs. for $362.16/cwt., 1,583 head at 85 lbs. and up for $350.94/cwt.
Boxed Lamb, weighted average prices ($/cwt.), Trimmed 4" Loins $585.26, Rack, roast-ready, frenched $1,715.57, Leg, trotter-off, partial boneless $544.81, Ground lamb $590.26, Shoulder, square-cut $316.70.
Imported Boxed Lamb, weighted average prices ($/cwt), AUS Rack (fresh, frenched, cap-off, 24-28 oz to 28 oz/up) $1,296.47, AUS Rack (frozen, frenched, cap-off, 20-24 oz & 24-28 oz) NA, NZ Rack (frozen, frenched, cap-off, (12 oz/dn) $1,341.70, AUS Shoulder (fresh, square-cut) $244.96, AUS Leg (semi boneless, fresh) $477.22.
Exported Adult Sheep, 0 sheep.
Wool, Price ($/pound) Clean, Delivered, Prices from 8 weeks ago: 18 micron (Grade 80s) 7.70, 19 micron (Grade 80s) 6.80, 20 micron (Grade 70s) 5.64, 21 micron (Grade 64-70s) 5.70, 22 micron (Grade 64s) 5.42, 23 micron (Grade 62s) 4.95, 24 micron (Grade 60-62s) 4.45, 25 micron (Grade 58s) 4.01, 26 micron (Grade 56-58s) 3.51, 27 micron (Grade 56s) 3.15, 28 micron (Grade 54s) NA, 29 micron (Grade 50-54s) 1.95, 30-34 micron (Grade 44-50s) 1.75.
Australian Wool, Clean, delivered FOB warehouse & gross producers ($/pound), 18 micron (Grade 80s) 6.56-7.44, 19 micron (Grade 80s) 5.74-6.51, 20 micron (Grade 70s) 5.03-5.70, 21 micron (Grade 64-70s) 4.88-5.53, 22 micron (Grade 64s) 4.67-5.29, 23 micron (Grade 62s) 4.30-4.88, 24 micron (Grade 60-62s) 3.73-4.23, 25 micron Grade 58s) 3.27-3.70, 26 micron (Grade 56-58s) 3.02-3.42, 28 micron (Grade 54s) 2.58-2.92, 30 micron (Grade 50s) 2.35-2.67, Merino Clippings 2.65-3.00.
1Prices reported for the two weight categories of the largest volume traded. 2The cutout value is the same as a net carcass value. It is a composite value that sums the value of the respective lamb cuts multiplied by their weights. It is also the gross carcass value less processing and packaging costs.
(Source: USDA/Agricultural Marketing Service)
Category
2011Loan Rate
EffectiveRepaymentRate
LDP RateWeek of 8/24/11
Graded Wool
CLEAN PRICES in $ per pound
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American Sheep Industry Association | 9785 Maroon Circle, Ste 360 | Englewood | CO | 80112

Wednesday, August 24, 2011

bear in New Mexico

Note that in New Mexico problem bear can be taken by hunters. The Division of Parks and wildlife needs to have that flexibility in Colorado. J.Paul
 
 
Durango Herald Aug. 14, 2011
Fires, drought push bears into N.M. cities


BY JERI CLAUSING


ASSOCIATED PRESS


ALBUQUERQUE – Displaced by fires and short on food after months of drought, state game offi­cials say bears in search of a good meal are head­ing into the cities in unusually high numbers this summer.

In just the last week, a bear and her cub crashed a wedding at an exclusive Taos resort. A few days later, a bear was caught munching on fruit trees in a Santa Fe neighborhood. About 60 miles down the road, a bear was rescued from a tree in an Al­buquerque neighborhood. And earlier this sum­mer, a bear was caught on video checking garbage cans at the governor's mansion.

"There are bears everywhere," said Dan Wil­liams, spokesman for the New Mexico Depart­ment of Game and Fish. "It's a little busier this year than most for various reasons: We've had fires, we've had drought, we've had extreme heat. All of that has impacted the food source for the bears up high. Right now is when the bears really start trying to pack on weight for the winter. They are hungry, hungry. It's all about food for them right now. They will go to the easiest source of food right now – or any food."

Twenty-six bears have been trapped and re­leased back into the wild, Williams said. A record number – 147 – have been euthanized, 11 have been harvested by hunters and another 17 have killed on roads or other accidents.

Additionally, game and fish officers have brought 21 bears to the Wildlife Center in Espa­├▒ola this year, about two-thirds of which are cubs orphaned by fires and the drought.

"There's no food. So there's a lot bears," said Katherine Eagleson, executive director of the nonprofit rehabilitation refuge. "We've gotten some that have been burned by the fire and some that have gotten separated from their moms and some that are just hungry."

Eagleson said the center has been able to re­lease three bears back to the wild. One had to be euthanized while another, a 13- or 14-year-old female from the Las Conchas fire, is recovering from third-degree burns on all four paws and sec­ond- degree burns on other parts of her body.

Williams said in addition to the fires and drought, there also are more bears than usual.

"Our large carnivore biologist tells me that one of the reasons we are seeing so many bears this year is because the bears had a real good repro­ductive year going into this and the last couple of years," he said. "So there is a lot of offspring out there. In other words, there are just a lot of bears."

Williams said the bear who was tranquilized after crashing the wedding at El Monte Sagrado Resort on Aug. 6 has been released back into the wild, but her cub has not been found.
 
J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914
 

Tuesday, August 23, 2011

bear

 
When wildlife officers kill a bear it is wasted. If a hunter kills a bear the hide, meat, and other parts can be used. We need a change in the law to allow special hunts where necessary. J.Paul
 
 
Bear suspected in attacks killed   Durango Herald


THE ASSOCIATED PRESS


ASPEN – The black bear believed to be responsible for attacking two campers in separate incidents near Aspen this week has been killed by state wildlife of­ficers.

Spokesman Mike Porras of the Colorado Parks and Wildlife Division says offi­cers are confident that the bear was the one that bit two campers as they slept in their tents on Friday and Saturday. Both suffered leg injuries in the attacks at the campsites at Crater Lakes and the nearby Minnehaha Gulch area.

Department manager Perry Will says he believes only one bear was respon­sible given the similarities and locations of the at­tacks.
 
J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914
 

Monday, August 22, 2011

bear attack

2 campers near Aspen bitten in tents by bears

ASPEN – Campers near Aspen are on high alert after two separate campers were bitten through their tents by black bears in the last two days.

Mike Porras of Colorado Parks and Wildlife says the first attack happened just before dawn Friday, when a bear jumped on a tent containing three men near Carter Lake. One of the men was bitten on his left side but was not seriously hurt.

The second attack hap­pened early Saturday a few miles away near Buckskin Pass.

In that that case, a man alone in his tent was bit­ten on his right leg. He was hospitalized Saturday with non-life-threatening injuries. Two companions in separate tents scared off the bear.

It is not known whether the same bear attacked both men. Porras says wildlife investigators are looking for the bear and expect to euthanize it.
 
J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914
 

Sunday, August 21, 2011

Thought for the Day

Thought for the Day
"For I know the plans I have for you," declares the LORD, "plans to prosper you and not to harm you, plans to give you hope and a future. Then you will call upon me and come and pray to me, and I will listen to you. You will seek me and find me when you seek me with all your heart." Jeremiah 29:11-13 NIV
 
J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914
 

Sunday, August 7, 2011

Award

Brown Receives Camp Tender Award
Colorado Wool Growers Association Recognizes Rep. J. Paul Brown


DENVER—Last month, the Colorado Wool Growers Association recognized State Rep. J. Paul Brown for his commitment to Colorado's sheep industry. The CWGA gives their Camp Tender award to an outstanding individual or business that demonstrates exceptional devotion and a keen awareness to the needs of wool producers and sheep ranchers around the state.

The award was presented to Rep. Brown on July 27th, at the Colorado Wool Growers Association's 84th annual convention in Montrose.

"We are proud of J. Paul's ranching background and his desire to serve all citizens of Colorado,"said Bonnie Brown, Executive Director of the association, in a statement issued after the award's presentation.

"We believe his efforts to limit government and government spending and to encourage small business growth will strengthen Colorado. J. Paul has made a tremendous sacrifice to leave his family's ranch and serve in our state legislature. He represents core values that we can all be proud of."

Brown, R-Ignacio, was born and raised as a rancher in Colorado, helping out on his parents' property in the Four Corners area before becoming a rancher himself.

After receiving his award, Brown expressed nothing but gratitude and further commitment.

"It's an honor to receive this award," said Brown. "Everyday I strive to find new and effective ways to create jobs and stimulate the economy for all working families and small businesses."
 
J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914
 

Monday, August 1, 2011

Bear

 

Bear attacks on the rise

Wetmore rancher loses llama; teenage camper bit.

 

Tracy Harmon
Pueblo Chieftain
July 30, 2011

 

The Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife warns Southern Colorado residents that hungry bears are causing problems in the region.

  A Wetmore rancher lost a llama this week — the third animal lost to bear attacks on the ranch this summer. On July 15, a bear bit the leg of a teenager camping near Leadville.

As a result, wildlife officials are asking residents and vacationers to take extra care to avoid attracting hungry bears to homes, cabins, campgrounds and picnic areas.

  "Within the past few weeks, wildlife officers have responded to a higher than normal level of calls about bears entering homes, garages, sheds, tents, chicken coops and damaging beehives," said Michael Seraphin, spokesman for the Colorado Division of Parks and Wildlife "Officials also had to kill the bear that injured the teen camper — it had apparently ransacked a cooler outside a tent in an adjacent area of the camp prior to the incident."

  Canon City Wildlife Officer Zach Holder said a bear preying on a llama is "Not extremely common, but it does happen. There are some instances when it is a poor food year for bears that they will attack pigs, goats, chickens or llamas."

  The blame, in part, has been placed on dry conditions that have limited bears' food supply.

  "This has been a below average year for natural food for bears," explained Cory Chick, an area wildlife manager from Colorado Springs. "During the summer, bears depend on green, palatable vegetation, as well as bugs and other critters they find under rocks and logs as their primary food sources.

  "But those natural food sources are harder to find in dry conditions," Chick said.

  Holder said, "It is important to understand that a bear is ruled by his stomach. He spends all his time looking for something to eat."

  When humans are making it too easy for bears to find unnatural food around their homes, the bruins are resorting to alternate food sources. It is possible a bear is initially attracted by grain in a grain bin then takes advantage of another food source such as a chicken or a llama, Holder said.

  With prime feeding time for bears just ahead, wildlife managers are concerned that the number of bear encounters could increase and are advising people to remove food temptations from their homes and campsites to avoid confrontations with bears.

   "During dry years like this, the bears have to look harder for food, and in doing so, often end up finding what people leave out — garbage, bird feeders, barbecue grills and other human food," Chick said. "We are always going to have nuisance bears, but when bears are rewarded for foraging around houses and outbuildings, it increases the chances a nuisance bear becomes a dangerous bear."

  It's recommended people secure their trash, bring in bird feeders and pet food, and remove food attractants.

  If weather conditions improve by mid- to late-August, the fall food supply of fruit and acorns should improve the bear situation. In the meantime, the best solution is to recognize that Colorado is bear country and to learn to live with the bruins as responsibly as possible, Chick said.

  For more information on how to reduce the risk of bear conflicts in your neighborhood, go to http://wildlife.state.co.us/WildlifeSpecies/LivingWithWildlife/Mammals/LivingWithBearsL1.htm.

http://www.chieftain.com/news/local/bear-attacks-on-the-rise/article_cd4da7c6-ba66-11e0-b500-001cc4c002e0.html

J. Paul Brown
Colorado State Representative
House District 59
State Capitol
200 E. Colfax, Room 271
Denver, Colorado 80203
303-866-2914